Color me Seasonal, February!

Jessie Kanelos Weiner-thefrancofly-Color me Seasonal-February 2015

Yes, I know.  February’s fruits and vegetables look a lot like January’s.  If truth be told, drawing salsify, the hairy carrot on the left, is just as daunting as eating it.

But you know the drill by now.  Print it out.  Color it in.  Share on instagram using the hashtag #colormeseasonal.  And don’t forget to follow my attempts at micro-blogging on Instagram, too. Click here.

Happy February!

September: Color Me Seasonal

Jessie Kanelos Weiner-thefrancofly.com-sept color me seasonal

September still showcases the relics of the colorful summer months behind us.  So print out the illustration below, buy all the tomatoes you can carry, stockpile as much tomato coulis as you can and color in all the fruits and vegetables of September as you eat them.  Take a photo of your progress and add the hashtag #colormeseasonal and #thefrancofly.

Jessie Kanelos Weiner-Color Me Seasonal September-thefrancofly.com

Happy coloring!

 

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stars and stripes

Audrey Cerdan
© Audrey Cerdan

Weddings in France are a DIY affair.  My wedding was no exception.  My family flew in to Paris from all parts of the world, battling extreme jetlag to help us arrange flowers the night before.  I think the moment my mom truly warmed up to my now-husband was when she saw him trimming roses and expressing himself.  (ndlr: hehe)

Audrey Cerdan
© Audrey Cerdan

The recent wedding of two close friends was no exception. The American-obsessed bride and groom were open to ideas to personalize their countryside wedding in the rolling hills of Corrèze, in south-central France.  First up, an American dessert buffet created by a team of sweet toothed friends, myself included.

wec1405_mge_2747_08A_LORes

Since the wedding was hosted in the land of foie gras, a refrigerator display case borrowed from the local market held our greatest hits of American desserts, illuminating the party into the wee hours of the morning.

Audrey Cerdan
© Audrey Cerdan

Since my apple pie already donned stars and stripes (thanks, Pinterest!), I crafted a custom star spangled banner, too. And the bride and groom and their company of merry moutons.

Viva les mariés!

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Paris food trend forecasting MAD LIB-style!

Jessie Kanelos Weiner
Jessie Kanelos Weiner

Kicking yourself you didn’t open up a grilled cheese comptoir / burrata burrito bar/ mac ‘n’ cheese cupcake shack of your own?  In search of the next big thing, fill out the Paris food trend forecaster below.  Send me your results at thefrancofly@gmail.com.  I will publish my favorite and illustrate the most ridiculous food trend you come up with!  Happy trending!

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Bouffe for thought

By_______________________________(your name here)

Call it what you will.  After the uproaring success of ______________(nationality) __________________ (a finger food), _______________(nationality)______________(an American comfort food) and the latest _______________(food trend) and _______________(food trend) comptoir, something _______________(adjective) is brewing in the _______________(number between 1 and 20) arrondissement of Paris.  ______________________ (a cliché French saying)!

But the latest hotspot to woo _____________ (adjective) Parisians and _______________ (nationality) expats alike goes by the unassuming name of ________________ (adjective 1)_______________(noun 1).  What has evolved from a _____________(adjective) _______________(style of restaurant) in a ________________(type of transportation), has evolved into a full-blown empire, with locations expected to open soon in ______________(Midwestern city in America) and __________________(Metropolitan city in Asia).  The ___________ (adjective) brainchild of ___________(English first name-1)_____________ (French last name), _____________ (English name-1) has been dazzling its diners with a fresh take on ______________ (nationality)_____________ (a trendy food) since it opened its doors in _____________(a month).

Although _____________ (adjective 1)_______________(noun 2) is best known for its ______________(adjective)_____________(nationality)______________(a South American delicacy), diners wait upwards of ______________(number) for the _________________(adjective) ______________(food trend) macaroni and cheese sliders.  Don’t forget to wash it all down with a _______________(adjective) selection of ______________(type of drink) from the ______________(direction) of _________________(country).

After giving up a lucrative job in _______________(an industy), _______________(English first name 1) is passionate about sharing _____________(adjective)_____________(a food trend) with the ___________(adjective) masses.   “Really what we’re really aspiring to do is use ______________ (adjective) ingredients, sourced _______________ (adverb) and ________________(word to describe food) authenticity.”  Thanks, ___________(English name 1).  Now we can all have our ________________ (nationality)_____________(food trend) and eat it, too.

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What Else

I am truly delighted to share my recent illustrations for Nespresso’s partnership with the Festival de Cannes.

Four acclaimed chefs were invited to create a course inspired by a classic, Cannes-celebrated film.

Jessie Kanelos Weiner for Nespresso
Jessie Kanelos Weiner for Nespresso

In the Mood for Love reinterpreted by Pierre Sang Boyer.

Jessie Kanelos Weiner for Nespresso
Jessie Kanelos Weiner for Nespresso

La Dolce Vita according to Mauro Colagreco.

Jessie Kanelos Weiner for Nespresso
Jessie Kanelos Weiner for Nespresso

Amandine Chaignot revisits Pulp Fiction.

Jessie Kanelos Weiner for Nespresso
Jessie Kanelos Weiner for Nespresso

Christrophe Aribert’s Un Homme Une Femme.

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Discover more here.

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#donthatemebecauseitshomemade

foccacia1378

I have recently been on a bread kick, walking into aperos (the French after-hours exhale) craddling my homemade pretzel, bagel, Brasilian cheese puff or focaccia obsession.  My friends often roll their eyes as I unwrap my olive oil-scented focaccia of the moment. Hate if they will, but it is curiously the first thing to disappear off the table.

Buying a baguette is easy enough, but when I need a taste of home, my go-to source for spot-on recipes is King Arthur Flour.  Seduced by its hands-off 1-minute mix in a food processor, my trusty focaccia recipe has made a weekly appearance chez moi and has become my apero standby.  It’s cheap, impressive and quick enough to whip together before a soiree.  The most taxing part is waiting the hour or so it needs to rise.  But that time can be used for things like “freelancing” (a minute-to-minute recap of gmail accounts) and an Instagram documentation of the process.

A good recipe is like a good friend.  In this case, this recipe will always rise to the occasion.  I made this focaccia with a spoon in a country cabin in the rolling hills of Les Cévennes.  It still even worked out when I forgot to switch the oven from broiler to regular oven.  And it can be accessorized with just about anything left over in the fridge or pantry.  How about dressing one up in sesame seeds, poppy seeds, garlic powder and sea salt à la an everything bagel? If not, I borrowed a brilliant idea from cook Alix Lacloche while I was styling her book.  Inspired by the paper-thin lemon slices and fennel seeds in her crispy lemon pizzettes, it’s the perfect herbal addition to a focaccia evoking the sunshine of the South.

Haters are going to hate, but bakers are going to bake.

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Fool-proof foccacia adapted from King Arthur Flour

Yield: 1 loaf, 10 servings

1 ½ cups warm water

1 packet (5 g) dry, active yeast

2 teaspoons honey

3 ½ cups all-purpose flour

4 tablespoons olive oil + more for baking dish

1 teaspoon sea salt + more for sprinkling

 

For an “everything bagel” version:

1 tablespoon sesame seeds

1 tablespoon poppy seeds

½ teaspoon garlic powder

½ teaspoon sea salt

 

For a lemon/fennel seed version:

1 lemon, thinly sliced on a mandoline or in a food processor

1 tablespoon fennel seeds

 

1. Mix water, yeast and honey in the bowl of a food processor.  Let sit for 5 minutes until frothy.  Add flour, olive oil and salt.  Mix in the food processor for 1 minute, until the dough is smooth.  If using a hand mixer with a dough hook or a spoon, mix dough at least 1 minute until a soft, sticky dough forms.

2. Heavily coat a 8″ × 11″ baking dish with olive oil.  Sprinkle dish lightly with sea salt.  Press the dough into the pan evenly using oiled hands.  Cover with plastic wrap.  Let rise in a warm, draft-free place for 1 hour.

3. Preheat oven to 350 F.  Unwrap the dough.  It should be puffy and doubled in size.  Poke fingers into the dough to create indentations.  Drizzle lightly with olive oil and sprinkle with desired flavorings.

4. Bake for 25-30 minutes until the top of the focaccia is golden brown and springy to the touch.  Let cool before serving.

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