New Victory Garden Calendar / The Best Holiday Gift For Mom Under $20

Just in time for holiday giving, my latest project to give 2022 a joyful boost The New Victory Garden 2022 Calendar.

And it’s the perfect special something for the gardener/foodie/mother-in-law/designated auntie/Secret Santa-ee. And it’s conveniently under $20.

Available for purchase at your favorite non-evil bookseller and Amazon if you must. And please leave a short and sweet review if you can. They really do help a young non-Dan Brown author out.

Save-the-date! You can purchase a copy and peruse the originals at my studio open house October 9-10 at the Usine Chapal in Montreuil (2 rue Marcelin Berthelot 93100 Montreuil). I’ll also be clearing out original watercolors for very interesting prices. More to come…

Goodnight Caboodle: A Bedtime Story for the Nostalgic Millennial

In a great big room with a Stephanie Tanner bed, there was a JTT and a Kurt Cobain head…

Toddler-i-zing!

He seeks independence while also the comfort of his mother’s arms! A single Tic Tac makes him screech with glass-shattering zeal! Lock your windows and doors! It’s toddler-i-zing! Unfortunately inspired by real events.

Here’s some other cool stuff I’ve been up to. Wanna indulge your creative bug? I’m now teaching watercolor and illustration on Skillshare. I wrote an illustrated a guide to Julia Child’s favorite Parisian haunts in the Julia issue of Cherry Bombe Magazine. Missing Europe? Cookbook illustrations in Katie Quinn’s new-ish travelogue/cookbook Cheese, Wine, and Bread. Watercolor lettering and bespoke invitation suites to make any event beyond special.

Julia Child’s Paris: Following in Her Footsteps & An Illustrated Map of Her Favorite Places

An illustrated watercolor map guide to Julia Child's favorite boutiques, restaurants and other haunts in Paris.
Julia Child's favorite restaurant in Paris, Le Grand Vefour, frequented by Colette. Julia Child's favorite places in Paris. Julia Child guide to Paris
Julia Child's favorite places in Paris. Julia Child guide to Paris. Best French onion soup, Au Pied de Cochon. Best late-night eats in Paris
Julia Child's favorite places in Paris. Julia Child guide to Paris. E.Dehillerin copper pots. Best kitchenware stores in Paris. French copper pots
Julia Child's favorite places in Paris. Julia Child guide to Paris. Where did Julia Child live in Paris? Where to live in Paris?
Coffee at Les Deux Magots and dessert at Brasserie Lipp. Julia Child's favorite places in Paris. Julia Child guide to Paris. My Life in France.
Julia Child's favorite places in Paris. Julia Child guide to Paris. Le Cordon Bleu alumni. Best culinary schools paris.

Whenever I get asked about must-go places in my hometown of Chicago, I have to preface my list stating that all my recommendations are at least a century old. No poké bowl recommendations here! I like directing friends to the haunts that my family has been flocking to for generations so they can enjoy (occasionally) musty old school charm that I think of when I think of “home”. When I was researching Julia Child’s favorite Parisian haunts for the most recent Julia Child issue of Cherry Bombe Magazine, I was reassured that there were still many similarly eternal institutions in my adopted city. These are equally as loved by true Parisians and tourists alike. Enjoy.

Originally published in The Julia Child Issue of Cherry Bombe Magazine, which celebrates women in food.

How do you get better at drawing a still life?

Before you can tell a story with objects, you have to learn how to paint them first. In my latest Skillshare course Watercolor for Breakfast: A 7-Day Editorial Food Illustration Daily Practice, I challenge students to use their own breakfast to jump-start a week of editorial food illustrations.

But what if you’re not there yet? Drawing from primary references (AKA the real object itself) is the best way to train your eye to be in synch with your brushstrokes. 

Here are a few tips on getting better at painting a still life:


Take 1-2 minutes where you stare at the still life. This will seem loooooong at the beginning, but it’s the best way to gather information before you begin. Ask yourself a few questions.  How do all the objects connect?  What are the lightest and darkest spots? Do you think it’s important to include the background?

-Do a gestural sketch. If you’re new to drawing or still can’t seem to get started, give yourself a few drawing challenges à la art school. Draw the still life in 5 seconds. Then 10, then 15. Draw with your opposite hand. Draw it with a continuous line. Draw it with two complimentary colors. The more you loosen up, the easier it will be to synch your hand with your eye.

Study the light source. Is your light coming from the right side? Then all the objects will reflect light on the right side and have shadows on the left. It’s as simple as that, but it’s the best way to capture and communicate volume and give sense to your overall composition. 


-Style your still life. As a former food stylist, I recommend lots of micro tips in Watercolor for Breakfast about how to take a brute ingredient and turn it into something very special. Your final drawing is only as interesting as the still life that inspires it. Cut a fruit and vegetable in half or in slices. Add a cooking utensil or a step from the process of cooking a recipe. Add a branch from outside. Make sure everything isn’t all the same height. And always add something transparent (Alas, I’m now the art teacher I used to hate). 

-Feeling courageous? Add a touch of whimsy. Once you get the hang of drawing a still life, flip it on it’s head. Quickly draw the firsts 3 ideas off the top of your head. Imagine throwing it all in the air and draw how you think it will land. Create a fashion illustration using all the elements. How would this look in movement?

-Inspiration. Study the Dutch still life masters. Follow and participate in @stillherestilllife on Instagram, a weekly drawing challenge. That’s what generated all the still life illustrations above.

Take care! Happy drawing. And don’t drink the watercolor water.
-jkw

ART MASK & How to Read the New Facial Expressions

Feeling the pandemic slump? If you rarely leave the house, you might as well make it impactful, right? In my latest Skillshare course “ART MASK”, I teach students how to recreate my breathtaking 3-D watercolor masks. It’s a joyful statement piece that just needs your personal style attached. You can take the course free until February 15th using this link: https://skl.sh/3p3rHay. Please review and share a sketch. And do tag me so I can admire your creation @jessiekanelosweiner.

New Skillshare course & a Stuck-at-home romp

I’ve heard it said that creativity and child rearing have a tendency to cross-cancel each other. The outcome may lack a little polish, but it’s hilarious indeed. Here is an illustrated recap of a day spent with a freshly walking tot.

As our worlds close around us and we are stuck at home more than usual, it’s easy to think that inspiration is divine lightening that strikes from the outside world. When I was a young aspiring artist, I loved to draw but didn’t know “what” to draw. Observing my insular world gave me the greatest primary reference and fast tracked me to find my voice and style. (Don’t even ask about motherhood!)

I delve into all this in my new Skillshare course “Stuck at home self-portrait: capturing a moment in time with watercolor”. I walk you through how to reacquaint yourself with your surroundings, conceptualise an evocative drawing and how to use watercolor to efficiently execute it. If you’re new to watercolor, you can watch me make all the micro decisions that go into creating an illustration (where to start, when to stop, how to tame your watercolor!). And if you want to think more editorially about your work, I give you a clear prompt how to push yourself to take your work to the next level. Check it out. And I hope it can be a telling artefact for your grandkids all about how you were stuck inside for as long as you were.

Click here to get 2 free weeks of inspiring courses, including my own for free.