What Else

I am truly delighted to share my recent illustrations for Nespresso’s partnership with the Festival de Cannes.

Four acclaimed chefs were invited to create a course inspired by a classic, Cannes-celebrated film.

Jessie Kanelos Weiner for Nespresso
Jessie Kanelos Weiner for Nespresso

In the Mood for Love reinterpreted by Pierre Sang Boyer.

Jessie Kanelos Weiner for Nespresso
Jessie Kanelos Weiner for Nespresso

La Dolce Vita according to Mauro Colagreco.

Jessie Kanelos Weiner for Nespresso
Jessie Kanelos Weiner for Nespresso

Amandine Chaignot revisits Pulp Fiction.

Jessie Kanelos Weiner for Nespresso
Jessie Kanelos Weiner for Nespresso

Christrophe Aribert’s Un Homme Une Femme.

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Discover more here.

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Radin Chic cont.

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I know this is ancient history; so three weeks ago!  But I just had to share a peek inside Radin Chic.  One of the trickiest things about working with watercolors for me (other than the threat of constant smudging and the dangers of placing a 2-liter bowl of watercolor water next to a MacBook Pro!) is creating a sense of depth.  That’s partially the reason why I started experimenting with collage.  I act more impulsively cutting paper than hemming and hawing over a sketch with an overly anxious eraser in my hand. Starting with collage, watercolor adds just the right amount of detail and definition.

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Radin Chic by Alexandra de Lassus and Francois Simon

Éditions du Chêne

16.90 €

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local

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“Hey! If it isn’t the Dior model!” my producteur yells my way as I look over my shoulder for someone with supermodel powers and less sleepies under her eyes.  I’m talking about my local veggie vendor, Sebastian.  Biweekly, he is armed in his monochromatic fortress of seasonal treasures at my neighborhood market.  “SHE’S AMERICAINE!” he exclaims repeatedly as his blasé little old lady clients turn their heads away. The biweekly mortification surpassed once the presents began.  If customer fidelity is the result of free swag, I’m guilty as charged. I don’t know how he breaks even: the basil bouquets, cutting off a few euros here and there, and sneaking me a box of dreamy strawberries.  Not only are his springs onions pulled from Mother Earth the morning of, he is my go-to guy for seasonal recipe suggestions.  White asparagus stems can be sauteed, but the tough stems can be boiled then whizzed into a fantastically simple creme soup.  And finally someone has debunked the myth behind chervil!  Although I have compared it to parsley’s kid sister, it can be sprinkled on anything.  And like everything else, it can be whizzed into an easy creme soup, too.

A few days shy of reaching my 5-year mark in France, I rest forever loyal to good customer service.  Additionally, I have started thinking more locally since I started following my friend Emily’s blog Paris Paysanne. Farmers are fewer these days.  The global, local and ecological implications make up for the extra centimes of buying direct from the farmer.  But instead of putting into my own words, trust Emily’s.  And Sebastian’s.

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